Birth

Did My Water Break or Did I Just Pee?

Did My Water Break or Did I Just Pee?

Waiting for labour to start has got to be one of the most challenging experiences for pregnant mothers.

There are so many unknowns and questions, like:

“Is it today?”

“Is this a contraction?”

“When do I call someone?”

And, of course, THE MILLION DOLLAR QUESTION: “Did my water break or did I just pee?”

It's totally normal for you to wonder. In fact, we get that question all the time. So how can you tell whether your water is actually breaking, or you're just peeing?

My Empowering Birth Story

My Empowering Birth Story

I was cramping but in denial it was anything besides regular pregnancy cramps as it was still 5 days till my due date. I brought my husband lunch and he asked several times "are you sure you are not in labor" and I said "no way, just regular growing pains." I went on about my day. My husband got home from work at 4pm and called our midwife, she said to get some rest just in case it wasn't just "growing pains." I spend the evening watching The Mindy Project and eventually fell asleep.

Shared By Danielle

He couldn’t wait to meet us!

He couldn’t wait to meet us!

On Friday April 7th I woke up at midnight to a contraction. I laboured in bed for what felt like forever but turned out to only be a few minutes. My lovely doula was in the next room and was quick to come in and help me through these contractions while daddy got some last minute shut eye. He’d be needing it!

Birth Story Shared By Lindsay

Mama On The Move, Positions for Labour

Mama On The Move, Positions for Labour

The journey out from the womb seems like such a short distance, but in reality, navigating the passage through the pelvis is a long journey for a baby! Your muscles, tissue, and bones guide the baby’s positioning throughout labour and birth, and as the baby descends actually assist in signalling when to rotate its head or shoulders or extend to flex its neck.  You can help your baby along the way by changing your positions for labour frequently. 

By Selina Boily, RM

Bloodclots After Childbirth: What's Normal, What's Not

Bloodclots After Childbirth: What's Normal, What's Not

Passing clots of blood is not uncommon during the first two weeks postpartum and clot size can range from the size of a pea to a golf ball – and can be quite shocking if you’re not prepared.

Blood clots form when you are sitting or laying down – remember that blood we talked about pooling in the vagina?  As it pools, the blood may clot. Some women experience discomfort walking or using the toilet and many report that after passing a clot the discomfort goes away. Typically the rule of thumb is golf-ball sized clots are fine but baseball-sized clots require follow up with your midwife or doctor.

However, if you have prolonged red bleeding and clots after the first week postpartum and are experiencing pain in your abdomen or have any sign of fever or chills you should contact your care provider.

Written by Gill Polard

The Green Baby Shower--what you really need to know

The Green Baby Shower--what you really need to know

Manda Aufochs Gillespie, founded The Green Mama in 2007, bringing 15 years of environmental planning and research to the issue of raising healthy children. She has been described in the media as “the green guru” and “serious, but not absolute.” Her work has most recently been showcased on the televsion shows Save My Planet (on ABC’s Living Well network) and The Lazy Environmentalist (on HBO). She is currently writing a book on the environmental impacts on pregnancy and birth.